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prowland

Comment history

prowland (Anonymous) says...

at the time, Columbine was the worst school shooting in American history. Today it doesn't make the top ten.

prowland (Anonymous) says...

When was the Establishment Clause rescinded? i missed it. Seriously, Thomas Jefferson must be turning over in his grave. His wall of separation has become a bridge to state-funded bigotry. Why don't these private agencies have the courage to be, well, private?

prowland (Anonymous) says...

when was the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment repealed?

prowland (Anonymous) says...

Two problems with the "fact sheet." First, it cherry picks and misrepresents convenient "facts." --the implied correlation between 1.5 million cost of the jet and 155 million in contributions that would not happen without ownership and high daily cost of the jet. No doubt both are true, but the relationship is not supported, even with anecdotal examples. Second, intentionally vague references to peer institutions with private jets -- e.g., a list of other universities with "aviation arrangements involving private jets or charters." Not sure what" aviation arrangements" this has to do with owning and operating our private jet at $2,800 per day.

prowland (Anonymous) says...

fabulous! thank you

prowland (Anonymous) says...

KanCare is an abject, total failure, but that was the idea. Mission accomplished,
Sam.

prowland (Anonymous) says...

As a gun owner and user, I applaud the call for an incremental approach. And we have examples of reasonable regulation of guns whose benefits to society were far outweighed by their contribution to criminal behavior. Last i heard, sawed-off shotguns were illegal. In Heller the SC established gun ownership (including ownership of hand guns) under the 2nd Amendment as a fundamental right, establishing a high bar for imposing limits on that right. but in the same majority opinion Justice Scalia made it clear that exercise of this right was subject to reasonable limitations in light of the obvious risks to society of unfettered exercise of this right. this is, of course, not unique in constitutional interpretation -- as in free speech does not give one the right to shout fire in a crowded theater. Why? Because the only purpose of this exercise would be to maim and kill innocent people. Regulation of AR15s and similar guns designed for military use should be subjected to a vigorous public debate, not lumped in with a blanket response to the NRA's absolutist opposition to any regulation (with possible exception of bumps).

On Editorial: Guns and the art of compromise

Posted 22 February 2018, 9:03 a.m. Suggest removal

prowland (Anonymous) says...

Under the False Claims Act i believe whistleblowers like Shaheen get a significant percentage of any moneys awarded -- something like 20% -- against the defendants, with the remainder going to the feds. if what Shaheen says is true, surprising that the US is not joining the case. It would be interesting to know if a change of heart occurred at DOJ between last November and the recent decision not to join. No one should be surprised by the type of fraud alleged here under the current incentives driving doctor and hospital compensation -- the same incentives that make our health care the most expensive and least efficient in the developed world.

prowland (Anonymous) says...

these are public schools. the public has a right to know what was said and in what context. the suspicious lack of transparency by the School Board is destructive of public trust and may well have destroyed the career of a teacher whose primary transgression may have been to make students uncomfortable in the face of discomforting data. Absent transparency we will never know whether this is the case or whether the teacher at this stage of his career actually offered racist opinions that would more than justify his dismissal.

prowland (Anonymous) says...

no problem with work requirement for able-bodied adults who don't meet the safeguard exceptions, but it is mostly symbolic chest pounding. Two questions. First, does anyone think these able-bodied folks are going to find jobs with health insurance or a wage that enables them to buy health insurance rather than rely on Medicare? Second, and most important, when are we going to recognize that -- per the 60% of recipients who are already employed -- the Medicare Program is essentially a huge subsidy for low-wage employers like McDonalds et al -- a subsidy paid for by the rest of us?

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