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cille_king

Comment history

cille_king (Anonymous) says...

He found a dozen, mostly older white Republicans who thought they had the right to vote in two states.
He did find a new citizen who had voted before he became a citizen, under the impression that that was part of the requirement to become a citizen.

cille_king (Anonymous) says...

The Chamber may not have wanted the LJW reporters at the event.

cille_king (Anonymous) says...

Perhaps this will stop some of the Republicans from double voting - like those that the SOS has been finding that are registered and voting in two states.

cille_king (Anonymous) says...

Many people can easily re-register, if they have a computer to do it online (in a state that has online registration) or transportation during working hours to go to a place to register, and if they know that they have been removed from the voter rolls, so that they can re-register before the deadline to register.

cille_king (Anonymous) says...

"Kobach has repeatedly cited research by Jesse Richman, an associate professor at Old Dominion University, to support his claims about voter fraud. He cited that research to support his theory that millions of people voted illegally in the 2016 election, costing Trump the popular vote.

Under cross-examination, Richman said that his study does not support Kobach’s conclusions and he doesn’t know of any studies that do.

Before the trial, Richman had produced several highly questionable estimates of the number of noncitizens registered to vote in Kansas, which ranged from 1,000 to 18,000 individuals. When asked about the 18,000 figure, Richman admitted that it was an unweighted estimate with a small sample size and that a weighted sample size would, in fact, produce a better estimate.

The ACLU also presented an open letter signed by 200 political scientists who criticized Richman’s work and methodologies for identifying noncitizens on the voter rolls. One of these methods was flagging “foreign-sounding” names.

During cross-examination, Dale Ho, the director of the ACLU’s Voting Rights Project, asked Richman if he would have flagged the name “Carlos Murguia” as a foreign-sounding name. After Richman answered yes, Ho informed him that Murguia is a federal judge in the same courthouse as the trial."
https://www.aclu.org/blog/voting-righ...

cille_king (Anonymous) says...

There are many times that I was glad the cover was there, and would like to see it replaced.

cille_king (Anonymous) says...

In 2016, the people elected enough Dems and Moderates to reverse 2/3rds of Brownback's tax cuts for the wealthy. Maybe most Kansans really do want adequately funded schools (creates a educated workforce), maintained roads (less wear on cars), adequately paid prison guards (less prison uprisings), health care workers (keeps our communities safer), and government agencies that protect the children.

cille_king (Anonymous) says...

It's hard to keep up with speaking out against injustice and racism, when it's happening daily.

cille_king (Anonymous) says...

It's very premature. No agreement has been made, no substantial action taken.
Does starting a war elsewhere cancel any peace that he might bring in another?

cille_king (Anonymous) says...

Even before Planned Parenthood, women had abortions. Women have always had abortions, and will always have abortions. The law that made abortion legal, made it safe for women - no more coat hangers, people claiming to be doctors who put women's lives at risk - no more fatal infections.

Providing education and birth control is effective. Colorado just finished a several year experiment in providing free birth control, and the abortion rate was half of what it was before.

And regarding adoption - there are thousands of children in foster care - many born to parents who couldn't provide for them. Many who have been neglected or abused, who are waiting for adoption.

Yes, education, job training, mental and physical health services would all help families stay intact. Unfortunately, Kansas and the federal government have cut taxes on the wealthy, and thus cut programs for education, job training, and health services. The spread between the super rich and everyone else keeps growing - especially helped with the recent GOP tax cuts.

Full LJWorld.com site