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Ron Holzwarth

Comment history

RonHolzwarth (Ron Holzwarth) says...

A "better comment" is one that uses concise writing and does one of three main things:

1) A comment that makes a point by point response to another comment, followed by logical reasons for the commenter's point of view, without any personal attacks. Only the mildest refutations of statements made by another commenter should be done, and that should be done in a very polite fashion.

2) In many cases a comment is not a response to another comment, in which case logical points should be made, followed by factual statements and conclusions explaining why the commenter is sure his/her conclusions are true.

3) All comments should have an ending paragraph or statement summing it up.

Of course, there are many other aspects of a "better comment," and you learn these as you comment upon the site. After a few thousand to many thousands of comments, you can learn how to comment well. Having studied Logic in college helps a great deal.

I've made over 8,000 comments on this site, and a great many of them were well received. It took years to do that.

On Letter to the editor: Better comments

Posted 28 March 2018, 12:10 p.m. Suggest removal

RonHolzwarth (Ron Holzwarth) says...

"She said that while cigarettes are seen as disgusting, vaping is seen as cool."

In one way, vaping is very "cool." Go ahead and vape, kids. You too, adults. Go ahead and die of popcorn lung and cancer.

Then the government won't have to pay you as much Social Security, or maybe none at all because you're dead. That's so "cool," because for all your working lives you'll be paying into the system so others can benefit. And, there's no health care costs for dead bodies, that's "cool" too.

You can't fix Stupid.

RonHolzwarth (Ron Holzwarth) says...

I remember that. It was very nice.

RonHolzwarth (Ron Holzwarth) says...

I'll sure never forget the time I inadvertently started an out-of-control fire. I had to call the fire department for help. Further details are not forthcoming.

I suppose I could say this much. Exploding paint and aerosol cans make big booms and intense flashes of heat. It was quite impressive.

RonHolzwarth (Ron Holzwarth) says...

It would come out something more or less like this: Hullts'-vart

RonHolzwarth (Ron Holzwarth) says...

I imagine that the teacher just laughed, but that's just a guess. My grandfather didn't relay that part of the story.

An interesting thing about my family community's German - it's what's called Low German, or officially Plattdeutsch. It's considered to be a guttural language today, and little or no printed material is available in it. It's a dialect of German that's fast disappearing.

We were always told to never talk German as our families did - learn High German, or Hochdeutsch, in school, which is considered to be grammatically correct.

A bit of trivia: There are several different variations of the spelling of my last name. But, my name has the original German spelling. Correctly pronounced in German, it would be almost unrecognizable to an English speaker.

RonHolzwarth (Ron Holzwarth) says...

I have a family history story about German being spoken in secret by second and third graders, relayed by my grandfather.

The new rule was, no German was to be spoken at school anymore. This presented a difficulty, since German had been spoken at home and everywhere else for centuries, and now only English was to be spoken at school. This was difficult in some schools, because just about all of the students were of German heritage, although via Russia for the most part. They had left the German principalities in about 1820.

My grandfather knew of the children speaking softly to each other in the bushes during recess, because he was one of them, I'm sure.

There was a problem. At least one of the students was not German, and didn't know the language at all. He ran and told the teacher what was going on.

I remember so well how hard my grandfather laughed as he recalled that single student. He thought they were "selling our country down the river!"

Spys! Third graders whispering German in the bushes!

RonHolzwarth (Ron Holzwarth) says...

"Erdogan has threatened an “Ottoman slap.”"

That's terrifying, because the Ottoman Empire ended in 1922.

RonHolzwarth (Ron Holzwarth) says...

While it is true that the money saved by not paying the city sales tax on food is very likely to be spent elsewhere here in town, claiming that there is no loss in tax revenue to the city is an exaggeration.

Assume that $10 is not paid in sales tax on food. Spent elsewhere, it would generate only a bit over $0.90 in sales taxes paid on other items besides food. There would be other taxes paid besides that, for instance, property tax paid to the county by the business establishment or the owner of the property. Furthermore, income tax to the state would also be paid by the employees of said business establishment. And Federal tax also, for that matter.

So, the claim that there would be no loss to the city is not true. But it is true that the reduction in tax revenue would not be as great as it might appear.

RonHolzwarth (Ron Holzwarth) says...

Something not mentioned in the article is that birds, and other animals, can trigger intense allergic reactions in some people. I'm very aware of that because I have an inherited allergy to bird dander. It's really bad, around a bird I very quickly develop flu like symptoms that fortunately are alleviated within an hour or two after I'm no longer near the bird or its dander anymore.

And, some people are allergic to dogs, and others are allergic to cats.

If I were in close proximity to a bird on a jet, I would very quickly become very ill. It might not help very much to be seated away from the animal, because of the recirculation of the cabin air.

Do passengers have a right to an allergen free flight?

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