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Police seeing increased demand for civilian training after string of recent shootings; Lawrence police meet with school officials

Students hold their hands in the air as they are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, after a shooter opened fire on the campus. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

In the weeks following the deadly Valentine’s Day shooting at a Florida high school, Americans have had to confront an unsettling reality: It could happen anywhere.

And Lawrence residents, like many around the country, are looking to law enforcement officials for guidance on what to do if the worst should happen.

Captain Troy Squire leads the active shooter training for the Lawrence Police Department’s Basic Recruit Academy and also oversees C.R.A.S.E. classes (Civilian Response to Active Shooter Events) designed specifically for community members.

Squire said his department has seen an uptick in training requests in recent months, as mass shootings like those in Las Vegas, Parkland, Fla., and Sutherland Springs, Texas, have dominated headlines and political debates. The last year was the deadliest for mass killings in the U.S. in more than decade, with USA Today tallying 208 victims of mass killings from January to November 2017.

“There seems to be increased requests following active shooter events,” Squire wrote in an email. “We had one training that coincided with the new gun laws, and they wanted us to talk on the new gun laws.”

Lawrence Police have received about two dozen requests for training over the last few months, Squire said, and have visited local medical facilities, community organizations and churches to provide techniques and resources for dealing with active shooter scenarios.

Squire and his colleagues teach the “Avoid, Deny, Defend” strategy used by law enforcement agencies across the country since the Columbine High School massacre in 1999. The ADD plan emphasizes situational awareness, minimizing opportunities for shooters to gain access to potential victims (i.e., locking and barricading doors, silencing cellphones and turning off lights) and defending oneself by any means necessary.

The Lawrence Public Library underwent its second C.R.A.S.E. training workshop in about four years earlier this month, in the same week 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz allegedly gunned down 17 people at Florida’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

“It’s just the reality of being a public building,” Brad Allen, the library’s director, told the Journal-World. “You have to figure out how you’d prepare if anything like this were to happen.”

On any given day, somewhere around 2,000 people pass through the library’s doors at 707 Vermont St. The vast majority “aren’t staff and aren’t people we have control of, necessarily,” Allen said. That’s why he feels it’s important that staffers memorize escape routes (the library has only one publicly accessible entrance) and recognize potential defenses (furniture, books and shelving can all be thrown or used to block against a shooter) in order to protect themselves and library guests.

Some might use the phrase “soft target” to describe buildings like the library, with its lack of metal detectors and armed guards. Allen doesn’t see either detectors or guards as viable solutions, at least not at the Lawrence Public Library. But he also feels the community needs to think seriously about what’s most important: personal safety or personal liberty?

“Should a school be built like a prison? Should it have metal detectors? How do we want to defend buildings? If we want this to be an open and welcoming place, there are some risks that come with that,” Allen said.

In schools

School districts across the country are confronting similar questions in the wake of the Parkland shooting. District and school administrators from the Lawrence district met Monday with Lawrence Police Department representatives to discuss strategies that would strengthen crisis plans and procedures across the city’s 14 elementary schools, four middle schools and two high schools, school district spokeswoman Julie Boyle said in an email.

The Lawrence district got a scare Feb. 19, when a Free State High School student, just days after the Parkland massacre, allegedly used social media to threaten a school shooting in Lawrence. The incident was quickly reported to police, and that case — in which almost no details have been made public — is now in the hands of the Douglas County district attorney.

Boyle said administrators planned to attend active shooter training next month “and will continue to work with Lawrence Police to establish a framework for the training of additional staff.” Details about how many staff members would receive the training and what kinds of positions would be trained have yet to be worked out, Boyle said.

The district is also assembling an Emergency Operations Planning team that would include school staff and representatives from local law enforcement, emergency management, fire and medical services, in addition to First Student, the district’s student transportation provider. The aim, Boyle said, is increased security, minimization of damage and loss, and a swift return to “a regular functional level” after a crisis has passed.

“Student and staff safety is our top priority every day,” Boyle said in an email. “The Parkland, Florida school shooting, and other acts of violence, spur additional discussion and review of safety measures, crisis plans, and procedures.”

It’s a discussion school staff are encouraged to facilitate (in an age-appropriate manner) with students, Boyle added. In addition to full-time mental health professionals at each building, the district also retains three on-call crisis support teams that can be deployed to schools when needed.

The district is also exploring the idea of contracting security services (both Lawrence high schools already have armed resource officers on site) and employing “additional emergency communications tools,” Boyle said.

The Lawrence Public Library isn’t planning any additional security measures in the wake of the Florida shooting, however. Besides the cost to taxpayers, Allen said hiring armed guards doesn’t align with the library’s role as a self-proclaimed “safe space for everyone,” to borrow a phrase from the Lawrence Public Library’s own marketing efforts.

“What do we want the world we live in to look like? To me, I think that’s a question we all need to ask ourselves,” Allen said, later adding, “At this point, I’d like for us to be an open and inviting space. I guess we have to figure out how viable that is in our society as a community.”

Comments

Brock Masters

This is an interesting comment, “Besides the cost to taxpayers, Allen said hiring armed guards doesn’t align with the library’s role as a self-proclaimed “safe space for everyone,” to borrow a phrase from the Lawrence Public Library’s own marketing efforts.”

Does Allen believe the guards make the library unsafe or is it that there prescience would suggest that the library isn’t already safe?

I don’t understand the reluctance to fund security for public institutions to better protect our children. We spend money like drunken sailors on all kinds of projects, don’t collect what is owed us, but want to penny pinch when it comes to safety?

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Daniel Kennamore

Not everyone feels comfortable with someone having an assault weapon next to them and they shouldn't have to avoid the library because gun nuts can't imagine a world without their toys.

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Brock Masters

Dan it is disappointing that you have such trouble with reading comprehension. The article and comment isn’t about letting, as you immaturely refer to them, gun nuts in the library with guns, it is about providing professional security

A reasonable person would not assume that the security employed by the school would be armed with assault weapons.

You have the potential to add to the conversation but sadly fail by failing to take the time to read and understand what is being discussed so you can quickly name call.

Keep in mind any child can name call but it takes an intelligent mature person to debate an issue without name calling and snarky or demeaning remarks. I bet you can take the mature route if you try. Come on, I’m rooting for you.

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Daniel Kennamore

I understood it just fine.

Some people (myself included) are not comfortable around guns regardless of if it's a licensed private citizen or a guard.

I have just as much of a right to minimize how many guns I have to be around in public places as you do to demand to keep your toys despite all the harm they cause.

That said, I've never come across someone with as strong of a victim complex as you. Nearly every comment of yours is filled with 'omg stop being mean to me' drivel.

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Brock Masters

Danny Danny, you’re such a little cuck who has to lie to make a point. I’ve never said you’re mean to me, I just had hoped you’d try to act like. Grown up so we could have vigorous debates as I do enjoy opposing points of view.

Unfortunately you’ve proven being incapable of having such conversations. So name call all you want, lie all you want, it just shows you to be a little twerp who obviously got picked on a lot in school and life.

Have the last word little round boy.

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Daniel Kennamore

Lots of insults while complaining about insults.

It's almost like you use it as your go-to strategy when you don't have a real argument to stand on...which is frequently.

Thank you for removing yourself from a conversation you're not adding anything substantive to though. Have a good one.

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Bruce Weber

Your right Brock, we should leave the name calling, snarky, demeaning remarks to the leader of the free world

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Brock Masters

Well you have to admit he excels at it.

Seriously, wish he’d stop it.

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Jake Davis

You just made Brock's point...Not everyone feels comfortable with a nut walking into the library carrying an assault rifle, hence armed security guards make sense. You ever see how many calls the police department responds to at the library on a daily basis. Check out their call loads or listen to the police scanner once in awhile....it is NOT a safe place.

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Daniel Kennamore

"Not everyone feels comfortable with a nut walking into the library carrying an assault rifle"

Then make them illegal. The strategy of adding more guns to the equation has obviously failed.

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Brock Masters

It is illegal already to bring guns in the library moron.

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Daniel Kennamore

I meant in general, not just at the library and you knew that.

Thank you for your purposefully obtuse comment though. Really 'adding to the conversation', eh?

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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David Klamet

As horrifying as the events in Parkland were, we only publicize deaths when it is in a way that we can sensationalize.

The many, many parents who attend the funerals of their children who took their own lives, or died in car accidents, aren't any less grief-stricken. Are they? Are those deaths really less important?

As a society, we tolerate a lot of crazy things: homelessness, poverty, inequality, and countless other things we can all agree we should address.

We think we can fix the cause of these shootings, but not all the other things that take the lives of many, many young people.

The predictable outcome is that little or nothing will change, and even if it does, we will have ignored the biggest issues we face. Countless parents and family will still deal with the loss of children that I choose to believe we could have prevented.

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Monty Scott

I have better security at work than my kids do at LHS. What's wrong with this picture?

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Daniel Kennamore

Adding armed guards in places like banks actually INCREASES the risk of violence, and now these gun nuts want to try the same strategy at libraries and schools?

http://www.cnn.com/2014/12/09/us/arme...

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Joshua Cain

Daniel,

The title of your article is "Armed guards lack training and oversight -- with deadly consequences"

The same can be said of law enforcement. I'm not convinced that their perceived high level of training and decision making is any better evidenced by the never ending instances of them killing unarmed individuals.

Government can not protect you. Law enforcement can not protect you. Even when they are on the scene as we saw in Parkland.

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Bob Smith

NYC requires that the sidearms their police carry have 12 pound trigger pulls. That pretty much guarantees the police will be slinging lead hither, thither, and yon when they have to use said sidearms.

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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Bob Summers

This pic here says it all 'bout the cupcake generations needing "safe space" that will lead America tomorrow.

http://www2.ljworld.com/users/photos/...

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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P Allen Macfarlane

More snarkiness!

3 months, 3 weeks ago

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