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Saturday Column: Presidential candidates present striking contrasts

Let the battle begin.

The semifinal elimination contests have ended, and Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton now are engaged in the championship fight to determine who will take over the world’s most powerful elected office and, in effect, determine the future of the United States.

It’s likely to be a tough and extremely costly fight with no punches pulled. The recent Republican primary battles were the most costly in history. Clinton spent millions and has a huge war chest, and the price tag for the upcoming general election is sure to topple previous totals.

It’s not going to be a traditional presidential race where niceties and polite conduct are expected and observed. Rather, political gloves will be coming off; it will be a dirty, punishing, raw-knuckle battle.

In one way, the campaign could be described as a contest between fantasy and reality. Clinton proposing and portraying a wonderful, almost fairy-tale environment, where the federal government will assume greater control of the lives of all Americans to make sure everyone is treated equally with Uncle Sam providing the subsidies to level any inequities — and with Uncle Sam becoming more of a team player than a team leader in the international community.

Trump will focus on realities and call out what he believes to be the weaknesses, mistakes, failings and consequences of the Obama administration and how these negatives would be compounded if Clinton were to be elected. Trump will call for less government involvement and control, whereas Clinton will call for government playing a bigger role.

Trump is a champion of free enterprise and capitalism, while Clinton would use the federal government to serve as a governor, facilitator or referee to eliminate any unevenness in most every field of activity: employment, earnings, education, health care, etc.

Opinion polls taken during the recent primary elections made it clear the majority of voters dislike and are opposed to government insiders or those viewed as Washington establishment insiders. They are fed up with the inaction of those sent to Washington to make changes but who often became too comfortable in the Washington scene and became infected with Potomac fever.

Clinton certainly is the ultimate Washington insider, while Trump is just the opposite. There couldn’t be a matchup of two more opposite careers leading to the nomination. Clinton says she will adhere to the majority of the Obama philosophy as to the role of the federal government and social issues, while Trump pledges to make major changes or reject the Clinton-Obama plan for America and its citizens. Consider how the election will affect the U.S. Supreme Court.

One major advantage Clinton enjoys is the almost 50 percent of Americans who receive some form of government assistance. These individuals will be told their fiscal benefits would end if Trump is elected president.

Hillary faces the perception or belief by a majority of Americans that she doesn’t tell the truth, and Trump will hammer this message at every opportunity. Trump will be portrayed as an inexperienced blowhard, consumed by his ego, a racist who is unfit to serve as president. Clinton will talk about Trump being a billionaire with no knowledge of the challenges faced by ordinary citizens although Clinton and her husband have become millionaires many times over since entering politics in Arkansas and particularly since President Bill Clinton left office.

How many voters will vote for Clinton just because she is a woman? How many voters will oppose Trump believing him to be a male chauvinist?

By most any measurement, the public is being presented two candidates who are totally different, including how they would guide the country. Clinton is a professional and experienced lawmaker; Trump is a novice with no elective political experience.

Which will be the most honest with the public and which one is most likely to follow through on the pledges he or she makes to try to win voter approval? Which one is likely to do what is necessary to protect this country and its citizens? Who is best to improve the economy? Who is likely to bring about positive actions in Washington and start to restore respect and cooperation between Congress and the White House? What about respect by both foreign allies and those who oppose the U.S.?

And who is likely to gain and merit the respect of the American public through his or her actions, vision and commitment to make this country great in every respect?

Consider what’s riding on this election for the U.S. and its citizens for the present as well as for years to come.

It’s frightening.

Comments

Paul Beyer

"Which will be the most honest with the public and which one is most likely to follow through on the pledges he or she makes to try to win voter approval? Which one is likely to do what is necessary to protect this country and its citizens? Who is best to improve the economy? Who is likely to bring about positive actions in Washington and start to restore respect and cooperation between Congress and the White House? What about respect by both foreign allies and those who oppose the U.S.?

And who is likely to gain and merit the respect of the American public through his or her actions, vision and commitment to make this country great in every respect?"

Answer to above questions are easy. Clinton, but then having read Dolph's saturday rants, I know he can't accept facts that refute his mindless thoughts.

1 year, 5 months ago

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Ken Lassman

Thanks, Dolph, for clicking the "Forward" button when you received the talking points from the Republican National Committee. You can be counted on to fall into line when the marching orders are sent out, as evidenced by your lead-up criticism of Brownback before and after the gubernatorial election, but still coming out with a "vote for Brownback" editorial right before voting day. Such blind adherence to the GOP party line is getting to be more and more dangerous after the extremist coup and apparent subsequent collapse of that party.

I'm slightly encouraged by the last line you apparently inserted to the memo editorial: "It's frightening." There's still hope for you yet, Dolph.

1 year, 5 months ago

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Mike Green

"One major advantage Clinton enjoys is the almost 50 percent of Americans who receive some form of government assistance. These individuals will be told their fiscal benefits would end if Trump is elected president." - So Dolph supports Trump taking our social security?

1 year, 5 months ago

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Bob Summers

"Presidential candidates present striking contrasts"

Yes. Both self identify as their biological gender.

Truly a striking contrast in this post *transformation* America.

1 year, 5 months ago

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Mike Green

Are you sure BS? I think you only think you know.

1 year, 5 months ago

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Paul Beyer

BS is still pure BS. Too bad so many truly ignorant GOP voters in Kansas can't see that. BS still stinks no matter where it comes from, BS is still BS.

1 year, 5 months ago

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William Cummings

"One major advantage Clinton enjoys is the almost 50 percent of Americans who receive some form of government assistance."

It would be beneficial for the JW to provide their sources when making claims such as this. Having sources would enable the reader to have a more balanced understanding of the facts, and to draw a more rational conclusion.

Claims such as the one in quotes above proffered by the JW are often distorted. Did they include benefits for veterans, which not many of us would dispute? Did they include social security and medicare which are benefits that people paid for during a lifetime of work?

An example of an examination of a similarly distorted claim is located at http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/...

It seems that the JW should provide sources for such claims, rather than expecting us to believe them without question.

1 year, 5 months ago

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Barb Gordon

Fact checking would require Dolph to be a journalist instead of an opinionated newspaper owner.

1 year, 5 months ago

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Paul Beyer

And nobody has ever accused Dolph of being a journalist.He inherited th news paper.journalistic skills be damned.Just a vehicle to post his right wing rants.

1 year, 5 months ago

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Calvin Anders

There are not striking contrasts to these two candidates. Both have more or less pledged to maintain the status quo. Both will continue economic and tax policy that favors the super rich. Both will continue to pour huge sums into military contracts and maintaining a military presence in a large part of the world. Both will ignore criminal activity in the financial sector and neither will push for any serious reforms in law enforcement policies to address institutional racism and move away from militarization of the police . Both sides will tell you that the candidate on the other side is a crazy, deceitful sociopath who's hunger for power is outweighed only by their disregard for the will of the voters and the rule of law. But these are hollow arguments. We should beware of anyone who's primary platform is that they are not as crazy and awful as the alternative. Despite the cries of doom from both sides, these two are the same candidate each wrapped up in some distinct but colorful wedge issues. I will vote, and I think it is all our obligation to do so, but I refuse to vote for someone I don't want just because I'm threatened with a more evil alternative.

1 year, 5 months ago

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Paul R Getto

"Trump will focus on realities ..."
Sir: is this your first Saturday Comics Editorial? If so, keep up the good work.

1 year, 5 months ago

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Dorothy Hoyt-Reed

"One major advantage Clinton enjoys is the almost 50 percent of Americans who receive some form of government assistance."

So all the farmers in Kansas, the ranchers who lease federal government land for grazing for a minimal fee, without paying property taxes, the equally low drilling leases to oil companies, the big bankers who get a bunch of subsidies, etc. will all vote for Clinton? Hmm, it seems like they always vote Republican.

If you are including Social Security benefits, then stop right there. We pay into that. You, Mr. Simons have paid a meager percent of your money into Social Security, because of the cap. However, most Americans pay a much higher percent of their income, and deserve to get back that money at their retirement. Have you started to collect your SS? You don't really need it, since you still have a lot of income rolling in, and your job is not physically taxing. I suppose the measly SS payment to you is just chump change. But to others, who have worked hard all their lives and can no longer physically do the work, it is the only difference between starvation and homelessness. And the really ironic thing is even they vote Republican more than they vote Democrat.

1 year, 5 months ago

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Marc Wilborn

Please Dorothy, add up your SS and Medicare benefits that you have already received and compare that to the taxes that you paid. While I agree with you that those who have benefited the most should receive less from the government, to think that SS and Medicare are benefits that you have paid into at a fair and equitable manner is far fetched.

1 year, 5 months ago

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Richard Heckler

On another front a Jill Stein/Bernie Sanders ticket would be the most powerful ever for Single Payer Medical Insurance


Women's Rights would see formidable support as well.

1 year, 5 months ago

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Barb Gordon

A Stein/Sanders ticket would be the most powerful *spoiler* ever. Practice saying, "President Trump."

1 year, 5 months ago

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Bob Summers

I think my dog must be a Democrat.

https://youtu.be/H3VLqLLWxbQ

1 year, 5 months ago

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